Shopping for the Right Typeface

My client—who will remain unnamed—has asked me to use the following typefaces for the design of a website: Frutiger, Adobe Optima, Adobe Futura, and Lexicon No. 1 ADF Bundle. Of course, I’d have to purchase legal copies of the typefaces in order to use them. Frutiger consists of 14 fonts each costing $29.00 individually or $264.00, if purchased as a package from Adobe. Adobe Optima consists of 12 fonts each costing $29.00 individually or $265.00, if purchased as a package from Adobe. Adobe Futura consists of 20 fonts each costing $29.00 or $377.00, if purchased as a package from Adobe. The Lexicon No. 1 ADF Bundle includes six fonts that can be purchased for $391.00 each or as a package for $1874.00 from TEFF, the foundry that released it. These typefaces are going to cost $2780.00, not including taxes. It may be a good idea to convince my client to use different typefaces instead.

After taking into consideration my clients needs and the purpose of the online content my client has asked me create, I have decided that Revolution, Linux Libertine, and Mount are the typefaces that will best fulfill my client’s needs and won’t break the bank. I created a sample of each font, as well as one additional typeface I found interesting. Samples of each typeface are shown below.

Josephine Cortez Ayala displayed in Linux Libertine font

My name in Linux Libertine font.

Josephine Cortez Ayala displayed in Revolution font

My name in Revolution font.

Josephine Cortez Ayala displayed in Neoteric font

My name in Neoteric font.

Josephine Cortez Ayala displayed in Mount font

My name in Mount font.

Furthermore, after browsing through dozens of typefaces I have decided to incorporate Linux Libertine into my library of fonts. Linux Libertine and Roboto, a sans-serif typeface, will be the two fonts I will rely on heavily from now on. I have decided on these two typefaces because of their readability and the variation in their individual fonts. Linux Libertine and Roboto have good x-heights, come in a variety of weights, and are simple yet attractive. I believe both typefaces will allow users of any web content I create, to read text with ease. A sample of Linux Libertine is shown below.

Sample of Linux Libertine typeface applied to a large body of text.

Sample of Linux Libertine typeface applied to a large body of text.

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