Technology: A Win-Win

Hi, classmates! I’m Sarah Munroe and I’m a senior theatre and communication double-major. I’m pretty nervous about entering the “real world” soon– after all, my goal of becoming a Broadway actress does seem pretty crazy and far-fetched. To quote Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, though, “if your dreams don’t scare you, they aren’t big enough.” So here I am, with one more semester left, hoping to use my knowledge and experience in communication to score a decently paid yet flexible communication-related career to support myself as I audition for professional theatre roles. Could this career be arts management? PR? Advertising? We’ll just have to see…

One thing that many people don’t know about me is that I love to travel. I recently got back from a semester abroad in London (which was life changing and incredible: I definitely recommend studying abroad), and while I was across the pond I visited many different countries, including Hungary, Austria, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Belgium and France. I never did make it to Switzerland, though, and I’ve decided that I have to go back and see the Alps before I die.

I really enjoy technology. I always have. It’s a way for me to connect with my family and friends (such as through email, Skype, Facebook, and the blog I wrote while abroad), express my creativity (such as through the videos I’ve filmed and edited, and the website I made for myself). I’m pretty savvy when it comes to technology and have had some experience with multimedia and web design, so I’m not too worried about this class.

Although the methods we learn in this class may become obsolete by 2020, and almost certainly by 2025, I believe that it’s good to learn them anyway. As Kelley Holland’s CNBC article, “The case for a liberal arts education” proclaimed, liberal arts students can boost their earning prospects by learning computer programming skills. Since technology is useful and I find it to be fun, it’s a win-win!

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